Home

Summer Solstice Aboriginal Arts Festival

National Aboriginal Day in Canada

Aboriginal History Month

The Income Gap Between Aboriginal Peoples And The Rest Of Canada


 

 

Summer Solstice Aboriginal Arts Festival

This festival is held in Ottawa, Ontario to showcase Aboriginal music, arts, culture, and talent. Locals, visitors, and tourists are offered the opportunity to enjoy authentic food, dance, art, performances, and even fashion shows. Festivities are held to celebrate and promote aboriginal culture and feature the performances, art, and music of Metis, Inuit, and First Nations communities. Art workshops and a powwow are also held. This is a busy outdoor festival with thousands of visitors coming each year to take part in the celebrations. It is a truly authentic experience that features indigenous vendors, interactive workshops, comedians, musicians, storytelling, and a lot more. There is plenty of entertainment for visitors, from stilt walkers and pony rides to bungee trampoline and drumming contests, shopping, and Birds of Prey show. This is a unique opportunity to celebrate multicultural diversity and authentic cultural experience. The Summer Solstice Aboriginal Arts Festival features fun and family-friendly activities such as bouncy castles, body zorbs, petting zoo, and many others, all of which free to join and try. With many demonstrations and shows, this festival is not to be missed.

National Aboriginal Day in Canada

The National Aboriginal Day is a special event held on June 21st to celebrate and promote the unique contributions, culture, art, and heritage of Inuit, Metis, and First Nations communities in Canada. Event and activity ideas include workshops and displays, storytelling and traditional games, traditional dancers and drummers, and community feasts. Other activities include presentations on indigenous culture and cuisine, closing and opening prayers, Aboriginal language workshops, powwow, and artwork contests. Contemporary and traditional games are also played as part of the festivities. Students learn more about Aboriginal cuisine, culture, heroes, beliefs, and roots. Community events are also organized across Canada to celebrate and share best practices, including demonstrations, barbecues, and breakfasts. The National Aboriginal Day is celebrated annually and is a formal statutory holiday in the Northwest Territories since 2001, as proclaimed with the National Aboriginal Day Act.

Aboriginal History Month

The Aboriginal History Month is an opportunity for Canadians to celebrate and honor indigenous arts - http://ipaa.ca/, contributions, heritage, and culture. Events are held to recognize the vibe and strength of Inuit, First Nations, and Metis peoples as well as their historic contributions. Events and activities are organized across Canada, including traditional activities, powwow, fun activities for kids, and cultural celebrations. Different events are held to showcase performing arts, Aboriginal music, folklore and history, dance, and cuisine. Activities are held at multiple venues and locations, with displays of Aboriginal artifacts and workshops. Homemade food and refreshments are served, including jams and bannock. Events and workshops are held at venues such as the Duck Lake Regional Interpretive Centre, Batoche National Historic Site, Wanuskewin Heritage Park, and elsewhere to celebrate local cultures and join others for an authentic cultural experience.

The Income Gap between Aboriginal Communities and the Rest of Canada

The income gap between indigenous and non-indigenous Canadians is still high and won’t disappear any time soon. In fact, а study compiled at the CCPA - http://www.ccpa-accp.ca/ shows that it will take over 60 years for the income gap to close.

Reasons Why the Gap Persists

The income gap is big to begin with, with Aboriginal people earning 30 percent less than the average Canadian. Indigenous people on rural reserves make less compared to communities in urban reserves. Education levels are also part of the equation. Over 48 percent of First Nations people have postsecondary education, including university diplomas and certificates, college diplomas, and trades certificates. In contrast, close to 65 percent of non-indigenous people have postsecondary education, including college certificates and high school diplomas. The difference between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people with no degree, diploma, or certificate is also considerable. Close to 29 percent of Aboriginal people don’t have a certificate compared to slightly over 12 percent. The good news is that younger people from Aboriginal communities are more educated than older ones. They also have higher median incomes compared to indigenous people with lower levels of education. Those with lower income, especially poverty-stricken communities, are forced to live below the threshold, and their standard of living is considerably lower. In fact, studies show that about half of all children in First Nations communities live in poverty. Many families lack money to cover basic necessities such as accommodation, groceries, and utilities. Poor Canadians are more likely to live on credit and accumulate higher debt loads. Part of the explanation is that the rate of unemployment among Aboriginal people is significantly higher, and they are among the poorest, with higher rates of imprisonment, alcohol abuse, substance abuse, and suicide. The working poor are also more likely to live paycheck to paycheck - https://www.lifeoncredit.ca/bad-credit-personal-loans-in-canada/, and they often resort to subprime loans and other types of credit - https://www.lifeoncredit.ca/top-6-secured-credit-cards-for-canadians/ with high interest rates and unfavorable terms.

Prospects

The income and earnings disparities are significant, and studies show that even highly educated Aboriginal people earn less than non-indigenous Canadians. Another problem is that urban networking does not result in higher rates of employment and income levels. The effect of the sticky floor is part of an answer despite the fact that younger individuals with a post-secondary degree earn more and have about the same income as non-Aboriginal people with a Bachelor’s degree. There are also differences between communities (Inuit, Metis, First Nations), and factors such as gender and location also play a role. Good practices and strategies are of especial importance because of the high economic and social costs First Nations people face. There are ways out of the legacy of colonialism, and it is important to fully implement the right to self-determination. Decisions that are made in the best interest of Aboriginal peoples only make matters worse and perpetuate the vicious cycle of poverty.

HOME : ABOUT : CONTACT